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poynterinstitute:

While exploring the new Inside.com app, which collects content from a variety of news organizations and summarizes stories in a maximum of 300 characters, I wasn’t surprised to see the term “curators” in its App Store description.

But I was a little surprised to see the term regurgitated without question in so many news stories about Inside — at Time, at TechCrunch, at Capital New York, at the Next Web, at CNET.

Curation’s a lofty term for summarizing other journalists’ reporting — even for high-level summarizing from multiple sources, which doesn’t seem to be Inside’s M.O. So let’s call it what it is, even if the term comes with some baggage: aggregation.

Check out Sam Kirkland’s article about how the word “curate” now means summarizing others’ content.

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ucresearch:

One of our Favorites: Anatomy Professor Marian Diamond.
She is one of the world’s renowned experts in neuroanatomy (and even did research on Einstein’s brain). 
She’s also a bit of a YouTube star — you can watch her popular course on general human anatomy.

ucresearch:

One of our Favorites: Anatomy Professor Marian Diamond.

She is one of the world’s renowned experts in neuroanatomy (and even did research on Einstein’s brain). 

She’s also a bit of a YouTube star — you can watch her popular course on general human anatomy.

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"I have never been “disenchanted” with language—well, except the times a businessman has talked to me. This has actually happened once or twice. My enchantment is just a side effect of the fact that I have a worm’s-eye view of language rather than a bird’s-eye view, I think. I’m a slow reader, and a compulsive re-reader as well, which gives me a lot of time to observe what the words actually look like, what they look like next to each other, what their component parts are. I’m a slow writer too, so to consider the language itself in my poems, as well as what I’m using to write down the language, and what I’m writing the language on, comes naturally to me. I’m not just obsessed by the vehicle, I’m obsessed by the vehicle of the vehicle. If I’m writing with a pen, I want to include the pen in the poem—though I guess if I’m being honest, I should really write more about the computer, and the keyboard, and what it feels like to touch its hundred abs."

The Rumpus Interview With Patricia Lockwood (via therumpus)

(via therumpus)

Photo
wapiti3:

Biologia Centrali-Americana :zoology, botany and archaeology /edited by Frederick Ducane Godman and Osbert Salvin. on Flickr.
Via Flickr: Publication info [London :Published for the editors by R. H. Porter],1879-1915 BHL Collections: Smithsonian Libraries

I want this on the wall above my bed. To protect, to intimidate, to dream about. 

wapiti3:

Biologia Centrali-Americana :zoology, botany and archaeology /edited by Frederick Ducane Godman and Osbert Salvin. on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Publication info [London :Published for the editors by R. H. Porter],1879-1915
BHL Collections:
Smithsonian Libraries

I want this on the wall above my bed. To protect, to intimidate, to dream about. 

(via scientificillustration)

Video

What was your childhood like? 

Photoset

gcourvo:

1) It’s those quiet ones you’ve got to watch out for. Those really nice girls, those innocent sweeties in the world - they’re capable of such dynamic destruction.

2) A girl’s popularity is based on how much she is hated by other girls.

3) Feminism. There’s no alternate. It’s a perfectly good word, and it can’t be changed, won’t be changed.

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Imagine the random Whovians who decided to visit Trafalgar Square the day they were filming this. “Oh hey, there’s Matt Smith hanging out of a flying Tardis, NBD.” It’s nice to think that’s what daily life in Britain is like. 

Imagine the random Whovians who decided to visit Trafalgar Square the day they were filming this. “Oh hey, there’s Matt Smith hanging out of a flying Tardis, NBD.” It’s nice to think that’s what daily life in Britain is like. 

(Source: wiinterquay, via ficsandteamakeahappyme)